ACNS 2025

ACNS 2025: 23rd International Conference on Applied Cryptography and Network Security | Munich, Germany | 23-26 June, 2025

© München Tourismus, Thomas Klinger

The 23rd International Conference on Applied Cryptography and Network Security (ACNS 2025) will be held in Munich, Germany on 23-26 June 2025, hosted by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München and the Bavarian Research Association “Security in Everyday Digitization” (ForDaySec). The proceedings of ACNS 2025 will be published by Springer in the LNCS series.

ACNS is an annual conference focusing on current developments that advance the areas of applied cryptography, cyber security (including network and computer security) and privacy. The goal is to represent both academic research works as well as developments in industrial and technical frontiers. Submissions may focus on the modelling, design, analysis (including security proofs and attacks), development (e.g. implementations), deployment (e.g. system integration), and maintenance (e.g. performance measurements, usability studies) of algorithms, protocols, standards, implementations, technologies devices, systems standing in relation with applied cryptography, cyber security and privacy, while advancing or bringing new insights to the state of the art.

PC Chairs:
Marc Fischlin, TU Darmstadt
Veelasha Moonsamy, Ruhr-University Bochum

Workshop Chair:
Mark Manulis, University of the Bundeswehr Munich

Contact

More information will be available on this webpage soon. For further questions please contact the General Chairs:

Prof. Dr. Johannes Kinder
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Chair of Programming Languages and Artificial Intelligence
firstname.lastname@lmu.de

Prof. Dr. Stefan Katzenbeisser
University of Passau
Chair of Computer Engineering
firstname.lastname@uni-passau.de

Post-quantum cryptography: Counting Down till 2033

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Post-quantum cryptography: Counting Down till 2033

06.11.2023

For the opening event of our Distinguished Lecture Series: Security in Everyday Digitization, we invited Prof. Dr. Bart Preneel from the KU Leuven in Belgium.

Description

Post-quantum cryptography: time to act
Experts predict that between 2033 and 2045, we will witness the emergence of powerful quantum computers capable of fundamentally compromising our current public-key systems, which form the bedrock of security for various network and application protocols (such as TLS, IPsec, SSH, EMV, PKI, and code updates).
While this might seem like a distant concern given the daily onslaught of cybersecurity threats, it is essential to recognize the urgency for two critical reasons.

  • Firstly, sensitive data, including medical and financial information, may retain its significance for several decades. High profile adversaries can collect and store this data today, anticipating future decryption capabilities enabled by quantum computers. This underscores the need to address quantum threats proactively.
  • Secondly, the transition to quantum-resistant infrastructure is an intricate and time-consuming process, especially in complex ecosystems comprising tens of billions of devices. It is estimated that this migration will take at least a decade to complete successfully.

Notably, recent developments have underscored the importance of preparing for the post-quantum era. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has released its initial draft of post-quantum standards, and the National Security Agency (NSA) has outlined an ambitious timeline for their implementation, with completion ranging from 2029 to 2033 depending on the application.

In light of these developments, any lingering doubt about the necessity of preparing for quantum threats is disappearing. It is now clear that every organization must commence planning for their migration in the coming year.

This talk provided a technical update on the new post-quantum standards and their practical implementation while addressing the challenges inherent in the migration process.

New Bavarian research network conducts research on everyday digitization risks

Podiumsgäste der Auftaktveranstaltung: Dr. Henrich Pöhls, Caroline Krohn, Prof. Dr. Dominik Herrmann, Prof. Dr. Sabine Pfeiffer und Andreas Sachs

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New Bavarian research network conducts research on everyday digitization risks

27.09.2022

Nuremberg. How do IT security solutions become suitable for everyday use? Which updates are really necessary? Does my company have an IT emergency plan? What data does my smart home device or smart phone store and disseminate about me? On October 5, 2022, the unique research project ForDaySec will be launched at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. The Bavarian research network will devote four years to the goal of bringing security to everyday digitization.

The unique selling point of “ForDaySec” is the targeted, interdisciplinary research into novel technical procedures for the cyber security of private households, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and public administration. With this goal in mind, “ForDaySec” researches not only solutions for increasing security for hardware and software, but also special security concepts that should be easy to use without special knowledge and at the same time take into account aspects of technical data protection. The research also includes legal studies on update obligations and sociological studies on the use of technology in everyday practice. The group is co-chaired by Prof. Dr. Stefan Katzenbeisser from the University of Passau and Prof. Dr.-Ing. Felix Freiling from the Friedrich Alexander University of Nuremberg.

“Cybersecurity plays a key role in our free society,” emphasizes Markus Blume, Bavarian Minister of State for Science and the Arts, in connection with the funding of the research network. “Digitization is permeating all areas of life. At the same time, the threat of criminal attacks on the digital infrastructure is growing dramatically. That is why we are funding the Bavarian research association ‘ForDaySec – Security in Everyday Digitization’ with around 3.3 million euros. This is a forward-looking investment in the functionality and competitiveness of Bavaria as a high-tech state.”

Five universities in Bavaria are involved in the joint project with eight subprojects. Here, computer scientists, sociologists and legal scholars, among others, work together and research how cybersecurity can be anchored in the breadth of society. The Bavarian State Ministry of Science and the Arts is funding the network with 3.3 million euros over a period of four years. “We see ourselves as a nucleus for answers to complex IT security challenges that can be implemented in everyday life. To make everyday digital life more secure, we want to lower the barriers to using IT security techniques. It is precisely through our interdisciplinary approach that we will generate new knowledge to solve socially relevant problems,” says Felix Freiling, co-spokesperson of the ForDaySec research network and professor of computer science at Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg.

ForDaySec’s research focuses on four cross-cutting themes, whose questions have an impact on the subprojects:

1. Awareness: What education and knowledge transfer are necessary and how can complex IT security content be explained? Are there IT security mechanisms that run automatically without affecting the usability of the systems?

2. Updateability: Regular updates are crucial for IT security, both for software and IoT devices. What legal risks can arise if updates are not carried out? And what does that look like for devices in the low-price segment?

3. Security show case: The aim is to develop a demonstrator that makes it possible to test and evaluate research results in realistic scenarios.

4. Everyday Social Practices: How do people deal with smart devices and security infrastructures in their private everyday lives? How do small and medium-sized enterprises, large companies and organizations deal with existing security infrastructures?

The eight subprojects are being worked on in these five Bavarian universities:

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg is involved with two subprojects. Prof. Dr.-Ing. Felix Freiling and Dr. habil. Zinaida Benenson are creating a technical privacy analysis of app-controlled Internet of Things devices. In another subproject, Prof. Dr. Sabine Pfeiffer is investigating the everyday practices of users, their competence in dealing with everyday digital devices, and their institutional and organizational embedding.

The speaker University Passau contributes three subprojects. Prof. Dr. Stefan Katzenbeisser is investigating how vulnerable immutable terminals can be subsequently encapsulated and monitored. Prof. Dr. Joachim Posegga and Dr. Henrich C. Pöhls are researching how devices of the so-called Internet of Things can be securely integrated into home and corporate networks using encryption techniques. Prof. Dr. Thomas Riehm examines update obligations and rights of software manufacturers and distributors.

Prof. Dr. Claudia Eckert of the Technical University of Munich is investigating how insecure Internet of Things devices can be integrated into secure corporate infrastructures without risk.

At the Otto-Friedrich-University of Bamberg, the subproject of Prof. Dr. Dominik Herrmann investigates how the data protection competence of software developers can be strengthened by means of software components and training environments with a focus on usability and explainability.

The University of the Federal Armed Forces Munich is an associated partner of the network. Prof. Dr. Johannes Kinder is researching how firmware components can be hardened without the support of the manufacturer.

Panelists at the launch event: Dr. Henrich Pöhls, Caroline Krohn, Prof. Dr. Dominik Herrmann, Prof. Dr. Sabine Pfeiffer and Andreas Sachs
Panelists at the launch event: Dr. Henrich Pöhls, Caroline Krohn, Prof. Dr. Dominik Herrmann, Prof. Dr. Sabine Pfeiffer and Andreas Sachs

Download link of the press release


Scientific contact
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Felix Freiling
Co-speaker of the network
E-mail: felix.freiling@fau.de
Phone: +49 9131 85 69901

Press contact
Florian Rummler
Network organizer in the office
E-mail: florian.rummler@uni-passau.de
Phone: +49 (0) 851 509-6043


About the Bavarian research association
“Security in Everyday Digitization” (ForDaySec).

Speaker University:University of Passau
Other, participating universities:Technical University Munich, Friedrich- Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Otto-Friedrich-University Bamberg, University of the Federal Armed Forces Munich
Term:01.04.2022-31.03.2026
Funding amount:3.3 million euros
Funding source:Bavarian State Ministry for Science and Art

Minister Blume welcomes the launch of the research network for more security in digital everyday life

Bayerischer Staatsminister Markus Blume zu Gast bei der ersten Arbeitssitzung des Verbunds

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MINISTER BLUME WELCOMES THE LAUNCH OF THE RESEARCH NETWORK FOR MORE SECURITY IN DIGITAL EVERYDAY LIFE

13.05.2022

How do IT security solutions become suitable for everyday use? Which updates are really necessary? What data does my smart home device or smart phone store and disseminate about me? On May 13, Bavaria’s Science Minister Markus Blume officially kicked off the work of the “Security in Everyday Digitization” research network (ForDaySec), which is researching answers to these urgent questions.


Passau – At a first official working meeting, the ForDaySec research association gave Bavarian Science Minister Markus Blume, retired Science Minister Bernd Sibler and other political representatives an insight into the research work planned for the next four years.

“Cybersecurity has a key role to play in our free society” emphasized Blume. “Digitization is permeating all areas of life. At the same time, the threat of criminal attacks on the digital infrastructure is growing dramatically. That is why we are funding the Bavarian research association ‘ForDaySec – Security in Everyday Digitization’ with around 3.3 million euros. This is a forward-looking investment in the functionality and competitiveness of Bavaria as a high-tech state.”

The unique selling point of “ForDaySec” is the targeted, interdisciplinary research into novel technical processes for the cyber security of private households, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and public administration. With this goal in mind, “ForDaySec” is researching not only solutions for increasing security for hardware and software, but also special security concepts that should be easy to implement without special knowledge and at the same time take into account the aspects of technical data protection. The research also includes legal studies on update obligations and sociological studies on the use of technology in everyday practice.

Five universities in Bavaria are involved in the joint project with eight subprojects. Here, computer scientists, sociologists and legal scholars, among others, work together and research how cybersecurity can be anchored in the breadth of society. The Bavarian State Ministry of Science and the Arts is funding the network with 3.3 million euros over a period of four years.

“We see ourselves as a nucleus for answers to complex IT security challenges that can be implemented in everyday life. To safeguard everyday digitization, we want to lower the barriers to using IT security techniques. It is precisely through our interdisciplinary approach that we will generate new knowledge to solve socially relevant problems,” says Stefan Katzenbeisser, spokesperson for the ForDaySec research network and Professor of Computer Engineering at the University of Passau.

The University of Passau is involved as a host university with three subprojects. Prof. Dr. Stefan Katzenbeisser is investigating how vulnerable immutable terminals can be subsequently encapsulated and monitored. Prof. Dr. Joachim Posegga and Dr. Henrich C. Pöhls are researching how devices of the so-called Internet of Things can be securely integrated into home and corporate networks using encryption techniques. Prof. Dr. Thomas Riehm examines update obligations and rights of software manufacturers and distributors.

Prof. Dr. Claudia Eckert of the Technical University of Munich is investigating how insecure Internet of Things devices can be integrated into secure corporate infrastructures without risk.

The Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg has two participating subprojects. Prof. Dr.-Ing. Felix Freiling and Dr. habil. Zinaida Benenson are creating a technical privacy analysis of app-controlled Internet of Things devices. In another subproject, Prof. Dr. Sabine Pfeiffer is investigating the everyday practices of users, their competence in dealing with everyday digital devices, and their institutional and organizational embedding.

At the Otto-Friedrich-University of Bamberg, the subproject of Prof. Dr. Dominik Herrmann investigates how the data protection competence of software developers can be strengthened by means of software components and training environments with a focus on usability and explainability.

The University of the Federal Armed Forces Munich is an associated partner of the network. Prof. Dr. Johannes Kinder is researching how firmware components can be hardened without the support of the manufacturer.

Bavarian Minister of State Markus Blume as guest at the first working meeting of the network
Bavarian Minister of State Markus Blume as guest at the first working meeting of the network
Photo: University of Passau

Download the press release


Scientific contact

Prof. Dr. Stefan Katzenbeisser
Spokesman of the network
Email: Stefan.Katzenbeisser@uni-passau.de
Phone: +49 (0) 851 509-3040

Press contact

Florian Rummler
Network organizer in the office
Email: Florian.Rummler@uni-passau.de
Phone: +49 (0) 821 598-4891


About the Bavarian research association
“Security in Everyday Digitization” (ForDaySec).

Speaker University:University of Passau
Other, participating universities:Technical University Munich, Friedrich- Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Otto-Friedrich-University Bamberg, University of the Federal Armed Forces Munich
Term:01.04.2022-31.03.2026
Funding amount:3.3 million euros
Funding source:Bavarian State Ministry for Science and Art